Medical Assistance

Please note: The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the entities or individuals whose names appear on the following lists. Inclusion on this list is in no way an endorsement by the Department or the U.S. government. Names are listed alphabetically, and the order in which they appear has no other significance. The information on the list is provided directly by the local service providers; the Department is not in a position to vouch for such information.

In order to help American citizens, who might not speak Spanish, the Embassy maintains a list of English-speaking physicians in the Madrid area.  The Consulate General in Barcelona and the U.S. Consular Agents throughout Spain can provide information concerning the availability of health care in their respective regions.  The Department of State maintains information which may be of use should you experience a medical problem while outside the U.S.

After hours, the Duty Officer may be able to help an injured/sick American by contacting friends or relatives in the U.S. or by directing the American to a nearby health care facility.

Occasionally, an American citizen will want help arranging a medical evacuation (medevac) to the United States.  There are no U.S. government funds available to pay for medical treatment or medical evacuations, and U.S. nationality does not entitle a person to a military medical evacuation free of charge.  Medical evacuations can in fact cost up to $100,000 and the cost is born by the ill or injured person, the family and or the medical insurance company.

Important: American Citizens living or traveling abroad should be sure they have adequate medical insurance that will cover expenses incurred abroad.  Medicare and Medicaid are only valid in the United States.  Some private American medical insurance companies will pay for expenses abroad, but most require that the patient pay the bill first, then file for reimbursement.  Hospitals and health care providers will expect payment if you are not covered by the Spanish or the Andorran public health care system.  The United States Embassy does not have funding to help cover medical expenses of American citizens in Spain or Andorra.  You may find it useful to look into the possibility of obtaining a policy that specifically covers expenses incurred overseas.

Thinking of sending medication to Spain or Andorra by mail?

Spanish and Andorran regulations do not permit the international shipment of medication, so please do not ship medication from the United States to Spain or to Andorra.  Medications sent by mail will be stopped at customs and either returned (at your expense) or destroyed.

U.S. citizens who plan a lengthy trip to Spain or Andorra should bring enough medication for their stay or obtain a prescription for that medication from a local physician or drug store.

For inquiries regarding what type of medications can be brought to Spain, please contact the Spanish Embassy in the United States. The Spanish Embassy should give you guidance on the necessary paperwork and if your medication is permitted into Spain.   As Andorra does not have an airport, applicable law upon arrival would be the one at the port of entry (most likely Spain).

Medical Services List (PDF 390K) has been compiled to assist American citizens in Spain in the event medical services are required. The Embassy is unable to assume any responsibility for the activities of the organizations and individuals listed, but great care has been exercised to include only those who are thought to be capable, reliable and ethical. Additionally, it has not been possible to include in this listing all of the capable physicians practicing in Madrid. Users of this list should inquire in advance about hours of operations and fees.

Barcelona (PDF 493K)